Nexus 6P Review: 5 months Later

Ever woke up wondering where all your battery went? Fear no more, the massive Nexus 6P, along with Google’s latest software, Android Marshmallow is here. When buying the latest flagship smartphone, we are always intrigued at the start. However, how does the “best smartphone of 2015” last after extended usage?

After using this phone for almost half a year, I can assure you that it is one of the best, despite it’s flaws such as fragile design and camera bump.

It has a wide range of pros; it has great battery life, fast and reliable fingerprint scanner, great camera, strong front-facing stereo speakers, high resolution display, metal uni-body, USB Type-C charger, it is cheaper than some other Android flagships – and of course, pure, stock android.

Cons: Heavy, a couple bugs, non eye-catching design, no wireless charging.

Unfortunate cons include a heavy body, which is a compromise having metal in a smartphone typically brings. It has a non eye-catching design in some areas, and no wireless charging – something power users of Android will find a letdown.

Camera Samples

Contrast

2015-11-11

Low Light:

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Wildlife/Landscape:

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By far, the best, notorious feature the Nexus 6p has is pure, stock android. Coming straight from Google, there is no bloatware, skinning, or any burdensome software issues that other flagships bring. In addition, the latest updates will come straight to this smartphone. While Androids, even a Nexus, are not supported for very long, I was able to get an Android N developer preview running on this handset easily.

USB Type-C and great Google optimization bring battery life to an entirely new level. With extremely fast charging, and battery life consisting of 5-6 hours screen-on time, a lack of wireless capabilities are hardly an issue for someone like me.

In conclusion, the Nexus 6p is what the Nexus 6 should have been. Huawei and Google did an outstanding job, and will hopefully continue the legacy of Nexus devices.

Edited by Nick Suneja.

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